March 21, 2012
Desexualizing nudity is really important. There is nothing about the naked body that is inherently sexual. Our biblical culture has just equated it to humility and impurity. Sex is the only place where nudity occurs in our culture, and it becomes connected when no real connection is there (is a flaccid penis really that sexual?). If nudity were not sexual, how many women would not be blamed for getting raped because of what they were wearing? How would we feel about our “imperfect” naked bodies? What would our relationships be like? 

Desexualizing nudity is really important. There is nothing about the naked body that is inherently sexual. Our biblical culture has just equated it to humility and impurity. Sex is the only place where nudity occurs in our culture, and it becomes connected when no real connection is there (is a flaccid penis really that sexual?). If nudity were not sexual, how many women would not be blamed for getting raped because of what they were wearing? How would we feel about our “imperfect” naked bodies? What would our relationships be like? 

(Source: prettygirlfromvirginia, via duschlampe)

January 26, 2012

More scans from February’s Out. Considering the number of hot guys on my dashboard, I’m a total hypocrite here, but I just have to say that the increasing amount of bombardment men get from the media about what’s sexy and what they should look like is becoming an increasingly bigger issue. This is soft-core porn thinly veiled as a swimsuit fashion editorial. Whatever it is, all the men are muscular, masculine, and dominant. As a man, it not only tells me that my slim, mostly smooth body is inadequate, but it suggests that the body type pictured is relatively common and therefore easy to obtain and maintain. The most important way to resist the negative influence of media, I think, is simply to know what it is.

These images highlight another issue that I think is important. That is the somewhat common body obsession among gay men. These are only a few select pictures from that feature, there were more. Nearly every gay magazine I’ve read does something like this. I think the Eve Ensler quote I posted also applies to gay men and the gay community. We’re allowing this part of gay male subculture, reinforced by media, to distract from political goals.

January 17, 2012
An Open Letter to the Fat Girl I Saw at Hot Yoga in New York City

Body Acceptance is such an important issue for feminism. I love this editorial

(Source: fuckyeahyoga, via anamazingillusion)

January 9, 2012

Killing Us Softly IV - Jean Kilbourne

This is one of my favorite videos from one of my favorite feminist scholars. Her collection and analysis of advertisements and mass media in context with body image, feminism and its effect on people, I think, is really inspiring.

January 9, 2012

skinnifer asked: I'm sorry you don't like my post, but i'm not a feminist. I want to lose weight because I want to look better and feel better about myself and also be healthier. And so did all the women in these pictures, just because you dont agree with it or w/e doesnt mean you have the right to put everyone down who is trying to lose weight. I'm not encouraging body obsession, its just inspiration to girls like myself that it is possible to lose weight and feel better.

What I mean by my criticism of your post is that self-worth and feeling good about oneself shouldn’t be tied to body image. Unfortunately in our culture for women (and increasingly more men), self worth is connected to how close we can get ourselves to look like swimsuit models. Jean Kilbourne discusses in her video Killing Us Softly IV about how only a very small percentage of women fit the runway/swimsuit model body type (tall, thin, etc). Holding ourselves to these standards, I think, is dangerous and can cause a lot of harm to our self-esteem. I would argue that if feeling better about yourself means being thin, that not only can you feel better about yourself without losing weight and dieting, but that even if you lose 50 pounds you still won’t feel any different about yourself, you’ll just find another perceived flaw to focus on (believe me, I’ve been down that road). I don’t mean to put anyone down, just to criticize your connection between self-worth and body image

Also, the thing about feminism is that regardless of whether or not you call yourself a feminist, these issues affect you. As people we are all subjected to a culture with very clear definitions of “men” and “women,” many of which are not only unrealistic but harmful. Feminism only means to highlight these problems in our culture and give women and men an equal voice. As a member of our society you are a part of this discourse whether you like it or not.

January 9, 2012
"How do you keep women out of power? Keep us in front of the mirror"

Eve Ensler

P.S. I posted this separately because I like it that much :D

January 9, 2012
Re:”I’ve been looking for before and after pictures and I’ve found loads! :) Ready for some really good Thinspo!!”

thinspreme:

fatboy-slimmer:

helpmetostopeating:

thin-before-la:

All you girls are amazing<3 and I hope one day I can achieve what you all have! xx

i love these girls!!!!!! they are such a great motivation <3

Ooooh! I see Thinspire Me!

 Okay, most of the girls and women in the before pictures of this post are healthy. Why are we encouraging body obsession? A woman’s worth has nothing to do with the size of her belly. I find it really sad that these women are an “inspiration” merely for their ability to fit into a bikini. Also, that gif is annoying.

"How do you keep women out of power? Keep us in front of the mirror" -Eve Ensler

(Source: skinnifer, via anamazingillusion)